As I said in my last post,  I’m planning to live like an Italian this summer.  This means preparing the foundations  — planting and nurturing the fruit and vegetables that we will be eating this season.

Loganberries ripening

Loganberries ripening

My garden is bursting with new growth. The fruit trees — apple, nectarine, fig, pomegranate, apricot, lemon, and the vines —grape, passionfruit, berry and kiwi are showing signs of a great harvest.

Let’s hope (speriamo!) my green thumb endures . . .

 

Radish seedlings

Radish seedlings

 

Freshly planted tomatoes

Freshly planted tomatoes

 

Spinach

Baby spinach

Planting the foundations for an Italian summer

In order for growth and progress, it’s necessary to begin with good foundations. So it is in the garden. New vegetable beds have been created, the soil has been enriched, seeds have been sown and planting has begun!

Some of the summer vegetables I’ve planted:

  • pomodori (tomatoes)
  • melanzane (eggplant)
  • cetrioli (cucumbers)
  • lattuga (lettuce)
  • ravanello (radish)
  • barbabietola (beetroot)
  • peperoncino (chilli)
  • rucola (rocket)

 

Herbs and flowers

Herbs and flowers

Mine is not a dedicated orto (vegetable garden) as I love flowers too. It’s a cottage garden and the vegetables and herbs —basilico (basil), timo (lemon thyme), origano (oregano), salvia (sage), rosmarino (rosemary), aneto (dill) and prezzemolo e menta (parsley and mint) have to live among the roses, begonias, geraniums, hollyhocks and daisies.

Sage seedlings ready to be planted

Sage seedlings ready to be planted

Spring is in the air, but summer isn’t far behind. Over the next few months, we’ll see how my foundations for an Italian summer bears fruit.

Looking forward to un raccolto abbondante (a rich harvest!)

. . . Isabella

PS: Do you grow your own fruit and vegetables? What’s in your garden?

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